Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Associations Between Depression, Substance Use, and Academic Performance in College Students

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 1:30 PM

Department

Health Sciences

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Michaela George, MPH, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Substance abuse is a major issue in America, especially among college students. (“Overdose Death Rates”) Drug use habits start around adolescent age and they are usually set for a lifetime (Keyes et al.). Alcohol and illicit drugs cost the United States $417 billion every year (“Trends and Statistics”). Not only financially, but drug addiction takes a huge emotional toll on the person addicted and their loved ones. “ Each family and each family member is uniquely affected by the individual using substances including but not limited to having unmet developmental needs, impaired attachment, economic hardship, legal problems, [and] emotional distress” (Lander, et al.). Substance abuse does not discriminate, it is found all over the world and in all types of societies and economies. 51% of all full time college students have used an illicit drug at least once in their lifetime (Wadley). One of the most common substances on college campuses, alcohol, affects 25% of college students in terms of academic performance (Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, (ED)). Heavy marijuana use is also related to negative academic outcomes (Phillips, et al.). Major research studies have focused general population and not just college students. They also look at factors outside of academia such as substance use and personality (Marquez-Arrico, et al.) or substance use and video games (Gallimberti, et al.). Many different types of stresses can drive college students to use drugs, including mental health problems such as depression (Aselton). Early detection of depression is necessary because it is such a hindrance on academic performance (Orgiles). There are currently no studies that compare the substance use of depressed students to the substance abuse of non-depressed students. A major cause behind substance abuse is depression (and other mental health problems) so in theory, depressed students will have a higher rate of drug use versus non-depressed students.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 12:30 PM Apr 20th, 1:30 PM

Associations Between Depression, Substance Use, and Academic Performance in College Students

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Substance abuse is a major issue in America, especially among college students. (“Overdose Death Rates”) Drug use habits start around adolescent age and they are usually set for a lifetime (Keyes et al.). Alcohol and illicit drugs cost the United States $417 billion every year (“Trends and Statistics”). Not only financially, but drug addiction takes a huge emotional toll on the person addicted and their loved ones. “ Each family and each family member is uniquely affected by the individual using substances including but not limited to having unmet developmental needs, impaired attachment, economic hardship, legal problems, [and] emotional distress” (Lander, et al.). Substance abuse does not discriminate, it is found all over the world and in all types of societies and economies. 51% of all full time college students have used an illicit drug at least once in their lifetime (Wadley). One of the most common substances on college campuses, alcohol, affects 25% of college students in terms of academic performance (Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, (ED)). Heavy marijuana use is also related to negative academic outcomes (Phillips, et al.). Major research studies have focused general population and not just college students. They also look at factors outside of academia such as substance use and personality (Marquez-Arrico, et al.) or substance use and video games (Gallimberti, et al.). Many different types of stresses can drive college students to use drugs, including mental health problems such as depression (Aselton). Early detection of depression is necessary because it is such a hindrance on academic performance (Orgiles). There are currently no studies that compare the substance use of depressed students to the substance abuse of non-depressed students. A major cause behind substance abuse is depression (and other mental health problems) so in theory, depressed students will have a higher rate of drug use versus non-depressed students.