Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Woman On Top: Attitudes about Gender Inequities in Leadership Positions

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Maggie Benedict-Montgomery, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

According to the National Labor Bureau of Statistics, at least 44% of women make up the population of earning doctoral degrees and almost 52% of women earned their bachelor's degrees. Women have come from a long way of just being secretaries, nurse maids, and housekeepers. Yet, women continue to face discrimination and prejudice within the workplace; earning only seventy-seven cents for every dollar their male colleagues do (LBS, 2011). Previous studies have suggested that factors such as lack of female role models and/or support in leadership positions may be contributing to this phenomenon. One landmark study suggested that workers aren't convinced a female manager could be an effective leader, regardless of whether her credentials are equivalent to those of her male colleague (Simon and Landis, 1989). Others studies advised that females lack qualities needed for great leadership in business such negotiating skills (Laine & Turner, 2004).

Keywords: Gender Inequities, Equal Pay, STEM, Leadership, Management

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

Woman On Top: Attitudes about Gender Inequities in Leadership Positions

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

According to the National Labor Bureau of Statistics, at least 44% of women make up the population of earning doctoral degrees and almost 52% of women earned their bachelor's degrees. Women have come from a long way of just being secretaries, nurse maids, and housekeepers. Yet, women continue to face discrimination and prejudice within the workplace; earning only seventy-seven cents for every dollar their male colleagues do (LBS, 2011). Previous studies have suggested that factors such as lack of female role models and/or support in leadership positions may be contributing to this phenomenon. One landmark study suggested that workers aren't convinced a female manager could be an effective leader, regardless of whether her credentials are equivalent to those of her male colleague (Simon and Landis, 1989). Others studies advised that females lack qualities needed for great leadership in business such negotiating skills (Laine & Turner, 2004).

Keywords: Gender Inequities, Equal Pay, STEM, Leadership, Management