Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Reported Interventions for Reducing Anxiety and Distress in Adult Oncology Patients

Location

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 7:30 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 8:00 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor

Luanne Linnard-Palmer, Ed.D., RN

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Problem Statement:

The National Cancer Institute projects that breast, lung, bronchus, prostate, colon, rectum, bladder, skin, lymphoma, thyroid, renal, leukemia, endometrial, and pancreatic cancer, will be the most prevalent cancers in 2016 in the United States. Among the 1,685,210 newly diagnosed individuals with cancer, the National Cancer Institute reports that nearly half will experience some kind of anxiety or distress. These psychologic reactions can be attributed to changes in body image, pain, fatigue, social isolation, fear of the unknown, or fear of death. Feelings may heighten while waiting for test results, or waiting for a diagnosis. Anxiety and distress can lead to increased perception of pain, fatigue, nausea, and to decreased ability to cope. (National Cancer Institute, 2016).

The nurse is a cancer patient’s biggest ally, and as such should be able to help the patient find alternative therapies to help quell anxiety and distress. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to specifically investigate the most effective methods for reducing anxiety and distress in adult oncology patients’ perceptions of their diagnoses, treatments, and longevity.

Methods:

This researcher will use an interactive interview process to ascertain her subjects’ experiences with their own diagnosis, and treatment. Transcripts of the researcher-subject dialogue will be narrowed down to the most pertinent ideas, which will then be dissected into statements that specifically answer the research question, “What are effective methods for reducing anxiety and distress in adult oncology patients’ perceptions of their diagnoses, treatments, and longevity?” Themes will then be applied to the conceptual model of Patient Centered Care by Gerteis, et al (1993).

Results and Conclusions:

Pending

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Apr 20th, 7:30 PM Apr 20th, 8:00 PM

Reported Interventions for Reducing Anxiety and Distress in Adult Oncology Patients

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

Problem Statement:

The National Cancer Institute projects that breast, lung, bronchus, prostate, colon, rectum, bladder, skin, lymphoma, thyroid, renal, leukemia, endometrial, and pancreatic cancer, will be the most prevalent cancers in 2016 in the United States. Among the 1,685,210 newly diagnosed individuals with cancer, the National Cancer Institute reports that nearly half will experience some kind of anxiety or distress. These psychologic reactions can be attributed to changes in body image, pain, fatigue, social isolation, fear of the unknown, or fear of death. Feelings may heighten while waiting for test results, or waiting for a diagnosis. Anxiety and distress can lead to increased perception of pain, fatigue, nausea, and to decreased ability to cope. (National Cancer Institute, 2016).

The nurse is a cancer patient’s biggest ally, and as such should be able to help the patient find alternative therapies to help quell anxiety and distress. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to specifically investigate the most effective methods for reducing anxiety and distress in adult oncology patients’ perceptions of their diagnoses, treatments, and longevity.

Methods:

This researcher will use an interactive interview process to ascertain her subjects’ experiences with their own diagnosis, and treatment. Transcripts of the researcher-subject dialogue will be narrowed down to the most pertinent ideas, which will then be dissected into statements that specifically answer the research question, “What are effective methods for reducing anxiety and distress in adult oncology patients’ perceptions of their diagnoses, treatments, and longevity?” Themes will then be applied to the conceptual model of Patient Centered Care by Gerteis, et al (1993).

Results and Conclusions:

Pending