Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Functional Cognitive Activities for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study

Location

Guzman 114, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 1:15 PM

Department

Occupational Therapy

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Kitsum Li, OTD, OTR/L

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The purpose of this quantitative pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of the Functional Cognition Activities (FCA) for Adults with Brain Injury: A Sequential Approach, as authored by Mr. Rob Koch, OTR/L, to improve performance in meaningful occupations and decrease undesirable side effects. Individuals with TBI may have deficits in functional cognition, such as problem solving and lack of awareness, which could hinder their abilities to complete everyday occupations. Current literature has supported cognitive rehabilitation interventions to restore lost functions, however, there is limited research supporting the generalization of functional cognition skills to everyday occupations.

The study was composed of 16 one-on-one intervention sessions with two participants with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Intervention sessions consisted of participants completing individualized schedules of occupation-based tasks. The goal of each session was not to complete each task but to stay on schedule. The FCA approach incorporates three-global elements of functional cognition, namely, time parameters, environment, and interpersonal relationships which were used to reflect an individual’s level of independence. This study utilized a pretest posttest design using the Goal Attainment Scale, Kohlman Evaluation of Living Skills, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure to measure occupational performance and the participant’s perceived performance. The results of this pilot study contributed to the field of occupational therapy by providing preliminary research on the FCA approach for future studies to help individuals with TBI improve their functional cognition and improve independence.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 1:15 PM

Functional Cognitive Activities for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study

Guzman 114, Dominican University of California

The purpose of this quantitative pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of the Functional Cognition Activities (FCA) for Adults with Brain Injury: A Sequential Approach, as authored by Mr. Rob Koch, OTR/L, to improve performance in meaningful occupations and decrease undesirable side effects. Individuals with TBI may have deficits in functional cognition, such as problem solving and lack of awareness, which could hinder their abilities to complete everyday occupations. Current literature has supported cognitive rehabilitation interventions to restore lost functions, however, there is limited research supporting the generalization of functional cognition skills to everyday occupations.

The study was composed of 16 one-on-one intervention sessions with two participants with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Intervention sessions consisted of participants completing individualized schedules of occupation-based tasks. The goal of each session was not to complete each task but to stay on schedule. The FCA approach incorporates three-global elements of functional cognition, namely, time parameters, environment, and interpersonal relationships which were used to reflect an individual’s level of independence. This study utilized a pretest posttest design using the Goal Attainment Scale, Kohlman Evaluation of Living Skills, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure to measure occupational performance and the participant’s perceived performance. The results of this pilot study contributed to the field of occupational therapy by providing preliminary research on the FCA approach for future studies to help individuals with TBI improve their functional cognition and improve independence.