Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

Achieving Stability through Equitable Development in a Gentrifying City

Location

Guzman 201

Start Date

4-14-2016 6:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 6:15 PM

Department

Political Science and International Studies

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Gigi Gokcek, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

A strong economy creates a higher demand for labor and housing. As a result of this demand, Federal, State, City, and Non-profit sectors have an increased motivation to revitalize cities by attracting higher income residents into poorer cities. Gentrification is the term often associated with this phenomenon. Gentrification is the process of renewing and rebuilding a city accompanied by an influx of middle-class or affluent residents into deteriorating areas that often displace poorer residents. Some scholars argue that newcomers and old residents alike do not share the benefits of gentrification equally, while others claim that gentrification is not as one-sided. By using a multi-case study and examining three cities: Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle, this thesis asks, “What type of public policy can reduce the negative effects of gentrification? What kind of policy contributes to positive effects of gentrification? How can a gentrifying city become stable over a long period of time?” Public policy in Portland, Oregon during the 1990s through the late 2000s addressed several factors, such as affordable housing, economic opportunity, health equity, and land use. Portland offers a good model for how gentrification can benefit both new and existing residents.

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Apr 14th, 6:00 PM Apr 14th, 6:15 PM

Achieving Stability through Equitable Development in a Gentrifying City

Guzman 201

A strong economy creates a higher demand for labor and housing. As a result of this demand, Federal, State, City, and Non-profit sectors have an increased motivation to revitalize cities by attracting higher income residents into poorer cities. Gentrification is the term often associated with this phenomenon. Gentrification is the process of renewing and rebuilding a city accompanied by an influx of middle-class or affluent residents into deteriorating areas that often displace poorer residents. Some scholars argue that newcomers and old residents alike do not share the benefits of gentrification equally, while others claim that gentrification is not as one-sided. By using a multi-case study and examining three cities: Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle, this thesis asks, “What type of public policy can reduce the negative effects of gentrification? What kind of policy contributes to positive effects of gentrification? How can a gentrifying city become stable over a long period of time?” Public policy in Portland, Oregon during the 1990s through the late 2000s addressed several factors, such as affordable housing, economic opportunity, health equity, and land use. Portland offers a good model for how gentrification can benefit both new and existing residents.