Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

The Perceptions of Adult Intensive Care Nurses on Quality End-of-Life Care

Location

Guzman 113

Start Date

4-14-2016 8:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 8:30 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Luanne Linnard-Palmer, RN, MSN, OCN & Debbie Daunt, MSN, RN

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

How does one die a ‘good death’? Over the past century the definition of a ‘good death’ has evolved considerably, as dying has become increasingly institutionalized (Teno & Clarridge, et al. 2004). A rapidly aging population (Center of Disease Control, 2014), has caused great concern about the preparation of hospitals and health care providers to provide quality end-of-life (EOL) care for the current and anticipated population of older adults in coming years. It is the nurse’s responsibility to support a positive EOL experience for terminally ill and dying patients and their families. Although the amount of scholastic research on EOL care is growing, more compelling study is needed to illustrate the implications of poor quality end-of-life care on patients, families, and care providers. The aim of this study is to gain insight to intensive care nurses’ perspectives on EOL care and how to provide patients with EOL care that best facilitates a ‘good death’ in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting, to further contribute to the body of research surrounding quality EOL outcomes. A literature review was performed to determine the factors associated with quality care for patients at the end of life. The viewpoints of adult ICU nurses were collected through surveys that assessed their experiences with EOL patients and preparation strategies to provide EOL care. Data collection is currently being performed; responses will be analyzed using a phenomenological approach and the results of this study will be shared.

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Apr 14th, 8:00 PM Apr 14th, 8:30 PM

The Perceptions of Adult Intensive Care Nurses on Quality End-of-Life Care

Guzman 113

How does one die a ‘good death’? Over the past century the definition of a ‘good death’ has evolved considerably, as dying has become increasingly institutionalized (Teno & Clarridge, et al. 2004). A rapidly aging population (Center of Disease Control, 2014), has caused great concern about the preparation of hospitals and health care providers to provide quality end-of-life (EOL) care for the current and anticipated population of older adults in coming years. It is the nurse’s responsibility to support a positive EOL experience for terminally ill and dying patients and their families. Although the amount of scholastic research on EOL care is growing, more compelling study is needed to illustrate the implications of poor quality end-of-life care on patients, families, and care providers. The aim of this study is to gain insight to intensive care nurses’ perspectives on EOL care and how to provide patients with EOL care that best facilitates a ‘good death’ in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting, to further contribute to the body of research surrounding quality EOL outcomes. A literature review was performed to determine the factors associated with quality care for patients at the end of life. The viewpoints of adult ICU nurses were collected through surveys that assessed their experiences with EOL patients and preparation strategies to provide EOL care. Data collection is currently being performed; responses will be analyzed using a phenomenological approach and the results of this study will be shared.