Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

A Study of the Effectiveness of Sex Education in High School on the Behavior and Knowledge of College Students on Contraceptive Use

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-15-2016 4:30 PM

End Date

4-15-2016 5:30 PM

Department

Public Health

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Michaela George, Ph.D., MPH

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are growing public health problems (1). One of the evidence-based prevention methods found to be effective is educating children in school about safe sex practices (2). According to Center for Disease Control and Prevention: “34% of teenager have had sexual intercourse during the previous three months, and, of these teens, 41% did not use a condom the last time they had sex.” Because of these risky sexual behaviors, many teenagers are finding themselves no longer able to attend school regularly and without the right guidance may fall into a spiral of unfortunate circumstances (3). Moreover, untreated STIs can lead to increased secondary transmission, increased vulnerability to contract additional STIs, and even permanent morbidity, such as dementia (4). One of the most successful prevention techniques is sex education in the middle and high school (5). There are evidence based school programs that are effective, yet not all schools are practicing these techniques (6). Not all middle and high schools have sex education built into the curriculum, let alone follow the best practices when it comes to research. The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of sex education in middle and high schools and to identify a possible association with contraceptive use in college. Sex education varies not only in the United States but even within a county. There are many factors that come into play when looking at the type of sex education a young adult is exposed to (7). This study aims to identify those differences and explore the association with attitudes and behaviors of current contraception use in college students at Dominican University of California. This study will use both focus groups and a questionnaire to identify sex education received prior to college and subsequent attitudes and behaviors toward current risky sexual behavior. In addition, phone interviews will be conducted to see what different high schools are actual teaching in terms of sex education and seeing if they are align with what college students remember.

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Apr 15th, 4:30 PM Apr 15th, 5:30 PM

A Study of the Effectiveness of Sex Education in High School on the Behavior and Knowledge of College Students on Contraceptive Use

Guzman Lecture Hall

Teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are growing public health problems (1). One of the evidence-based prevention methods found to be effective is educating children in school about safe sex practices (2). According to Center for Disease Control and Prevention: “34% of teenager have had sexual intercourse during the previous three months, and, of these teens, 41% did not use a condom the last time they had sex.” Because of these risky sexual behaviors, many teenagers are finding themselves no longer able to attend school regularly and without the right guidance may fall into a spiral of unfortunate circumstances (3). Moreover, untreated STIs can lead to increased secondary transmission, increased vulnerability to contract additional STIs, and even permanent morbidity, such as dementia (4). One of the most successful prevention techniques is sex education in the middle and high school (5). There are evidence based school programs that are effective, yet not all schools are practicing these techniques (6). Not all middle and high schools have sex education built into the curriculum, let alone follow the best practices when it comes to research. The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of sex education in middle and high schools and to identify a possible association with contraceptive use in college. Sex education varies not only in the United States but even within a county. There are many factors that come into play when looking at the type of sex education a young adult is exposed to (7). This study aims to identify those differences and explore the association with attitudes and behaviors of current contraception use in college students at Dominican University of California. This study will use both focus groups and a questionnaire to identify sex education received prior to college and subsequent attitudes and behaviors toward current risky sexual behavior. In addition, phone interviews will be conducted to see what different high schools are actual teaching in terms of sex education and seeing if they are align with what college students remember.