Dominican University of California
 

All Conference Presentations, Performances and Exhibits

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-15-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-15-2016 3:30 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Luanne Linnard-Palmer, RN, MSN, OCN

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

In America there’s a paradoxical relationship with dying and death; it’s the one thing that is guaranteed, but often also denied. The stigma surrounding death partly contributes to the lack of training that healthcare professionals receive during their education; the other part is the primary focus in healthcare on curing. Most people will die in the hospital, particularly Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (Holms, Milligan & Kydd, 2014). Being as death and dying have a role in healthcare it would seem to be integral that healthcare professionals would have some education in End-of-Life-Care (EOLC), however it is just the opposite. Across the nation healthcare professionals get minimal, EOLC training (Jo & An, 2015). According to recent literature, the lack of education on EOLC, leads to a lack of confidence in healthcare professionals, which leads to the inability to be able to care and communicate with the patient and families effectively to address their needs during this time transition. This project discusses the lived experiences of healthcare providers and of the families who’s loved ones died in the ICU setting, the need for education and training of healthcare professionals across the nation, and the barriers for health professionals to get adequate training. Families and healthcare professionals alike express the need to have properly trained/educated healthcare professionals in hospitals. Adequate training increases the confidence of healthcare professional’s and their abilities to provide EOLC, and be able to communicate and address the needs of the patient and family. Healthcare professionals with EOLC training contribute to positive experiences to the patients and their families.

Reference:

Holms, N., Milligan, S. & Kydd, A. (2014). A study of the lived experiences of registered nurses who have provided end-of-life care within the intensive care unit. Internationals Journal Of Palliative Nursing, 20(11), 549-556. doi:10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.11.549

Jo, K.H., & An, G.J. (2015). Effect of end-of-life education using the humanistic approach in Korea. Collegian, 22(1), 91-97. doi: 10.1016/j.colegn.2013.11.008

Included in

Nursing Commons

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Apr 15th, 2:30 PM Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

Adequacy of End-of-life Care Knowledge & Skills in Nursing Education: Investigation into Family and Nurse’s Experiences in the Critical Care Setting, Educational Needs of Nurses and Barriers to Adequate Education

Guzman Lecture Hall

In America there’s a paradoxical relationship with dying and death; it’s the one thing that is guaranteed, but often also denied. The stigma surrounding death partly contributes to the lack of training that healthcare professionals receive during their education; the other part is the primary focus in healthcare on curing. Most people will die in the hospital, particularly Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (Holms, Milligan & Kydd, 2014). Being as death and dying have a role in healthcare it would seem to be integral that healthcare professionals would have some education in End-of-Life-Care (EOLC), however it is just the opposite. Across the nation healthcare professionals get minimal, EOLC training (Jo & An, 2015). According to recent literature, the lack of education on EOLC, leads to a lack of confidence in healthcare professionals, which leads to the inability to be able to care and communicate with the patient and families effectively to address their needs during this time transition. This project discusses the lived experiences of healthcare providers and of the families who’s loved ones died in the ICU setting, the need for education and training of healthcare professionals across the nation, and the barriers for health professionals to get adequate training. Families and healthcare professionals alike express the need to have properly trained/educated healthcare professionals in hospitals. Adequate training increases the confidence of healthcare professional’s and their abilities to provide EOLC, and be able to communicate and address the needs of the patient and family. Healthcare professionals with EOLC training contribute to positive experiences to the patients and their families.

Reference:

Holms, N., Milligan, S. & Kydd, A. (2014). A study of the lived experiences of registered nurses who have provided end-of-life care within the intensive care unit. Internationals Journal Of Palliative Nursing, 20(11), 549-556. doi:10.12968/ijpn.2014.20.11.549

Jo, K.H., & An, G.J. (2015). Effect of end-of-life education using the humanistic approach in Korea. Collegian, 22(1), 91-97. doi: 10.1016/j.colegn.2013.11.008