Dominican University of California
 

All Conference Presentations, Performances and Exhibits

Presentation or Panel Title

Fear of the White Coat: People's Health Anxiety and Going to the Doctor

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-15-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-15-2016 3:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Emily Newton, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Most people today go to the doctor in order to be alleviated from the pain they may feel. Often times, the physical pain a person may be feeling causes them to have emotional problems as well. Due to this, a doctor a must be equipped to handle both the physical and emotional troubles of their patients. Empathy plays a pivotal role in how well a doctor can provide care to their patients (Malterud, Fredriksen, & Gjerdge, 2009). Furthermore, it has been shown that patients have higher health anxiety when they worry about having an illness (Conroy, Smyth, Siriwardena, & Fernandes, 1998). The purpose of this present study is to examine the association between doctor empathy and the health anxiety of a patient. Participants (n=80) recruited from Dominican University of California will be sent an email containing a Survey Monkey link with three different questionnaires. First, participants will be asked 10 questions regarding their feelings and beliefs about doctor empathy in the Patient-Perceived Empathy Scale (Kim, Kaplowitz, & Johnston 2004). Next, participants will answer 21 questions assessing their anxiety toward illness within the Lucock and Morley Health Anxiety Questionnaire (Lucock & Morley, 1996). Lastly, students will answer a 5-item survey regarding the likelihood that they would go to the doctor. It is hypothesized that 1) patients will have lower levels of health anxiety if they perceive their doctor as very empathic, and 2) patients who view their doctor as empathetic will be more likely to go the doctor. Data collection for the study will be completed in February. The findings from this study could help put a greater emphasis on teaching empathy in pre-health professional currriculums. Furthermore, the results of this study can provide insight to how caring for the mental and physical aspects of a patient are equally important.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 2:30 PM Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

Fear of the White Coat: People's Health Anxiety and Going to the Doctor

Guzman Lecture Hall

Most people today go to the doctor in order to be alleviated from the pain they may feel. Often times, the physical pain a person may be feeling causes them to have emotional problems as well. Due to this, a doctor a must be equipped to handle both the physical and emotional troubles of their patients. Empathy plays a pivotal role in how well a doctor can provide care to their patients (Malterud, Fredriksen, & Gjerdge, 2009). Furthermore, it has been shown that patients have higher health anxiety when they worry about having an illness (Conroy, Smyth, Siriwardena, & Fernandes, 1998). The purpose of this present study is to examine the association between doctor empathy and the health anxiety of a patient. Participants (n=80) recruited from Dominican University of California will be sent an email containing a Survey Monkey link with three different questionnaires. First, participants will be asked 10 questions regarding their feelings and beliefs about doctor empathy in the Patient-Perceived Empathy Scale (Kim, Kaplowitz, & Johnston 2004). Next, participants will answer 21 questions assessing their anxiety toward illness within the Lucock and Morley Health Anxiety Questionnaire (Lucock & Morley, 1996). Lastly, students will answer a 5-item survey regarding the likelihood that they would go to the doctor. It is hypothesized that 1) patients will have lower levels of health anxiety if they perceive their doctor as very empathic, and 2) patients who view their doctor as empathetic will be more likely to go the doctor. Data collection for the study will be completed in February. The findings from this study could help put a greater emphasis on teaching empathy in pre-health professional currriculums. Furthermore, the results of this study can provide insight to how caring for the mental and physical aspects of a patient are equally important.