Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

The Differences in Stress Levels Experienced Between Civilian and Military Service Members

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-14-2016 7:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 8:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

William Phillips, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The purpose of this study is to examine the different levels of stress that civilians experience verses military service members. It will also examine how gender and age may affect levels of stress. A study performed by Jacobson, Donoho, Crum-Cianflone, and Maguen (2001) reported that when looking at PTSD differences among a total of 2342 men and 2342 women who served in the military; women were not any more likely to develop a stress disorder then men. The test was performed using the Patient Checklist-Civilian (PCC) version as their measurement, a self-report of 17 questions measuring PTSD symptoms. Using the DSM-IV as the criteria, participants scoring moderate to high on PCC scale were determined to be suffering from PTSD. The present study will look at the stress differences between military and non-military personal, as well as differences in gender and age. James Amirkhan created the SOS, (2012) a test designed to look at the connection between stress and health. I will be using the SOS because it is a better scale when looking at a general population as well as stress and health. This survey is a total of 36 questions on everyday stress and basic demographics. It is hypothesized that military service members will have higher levels of stress in comparison to civilians. For military personnel, stress levels between women and men will be similar, but for non-military personnel, women will have higher stress than men. Furthermore, younger military personnel (18 to 40) will have more stress than older military personnel (greater than 40). Data collection will take place February and March of 2016.

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Apr 14th, 7:00 PM Apr 14th, 8:00 PM

The Differences in Stress Levels Experienced Between Civilian and Military Service Members

Guzman Lecture Hall

The purpose of this study is to examine the different levels of stress that civilians experience verses military service members. It will also examine how gender and age may affect levels of stress. A study performed by Jacobson, Donoho, Crum-Cianflone, and Maguen (2001) reported that when looking at PTSD differences among a total of 2342 men and 2342 women who served in the military; women were not any more likely to develop a stress disorder then men. The test was performed using the Patient Checklist-Civilian (PCC) version as their measurement, a self-report of 17 questions measuring PTSD symptoms. Using the DSM-IV as the criteria, participants scoring moderate to high on PCC scale were determined to be suffering from PTSD. The present study will look at the stress differences between military and non-military personal, as well as differences in gender and age. James Amirkhan created the SOS, (2012) a test designed to look at the connection between stress and health. I will be using the SOS because it is a better scale when looking at a general population as well as stress and health. This survey is a total of 36 questions on everyday stress and basic demographics. It is hypothesized that military service members will have higher levels of stress in comparison to civilians. For military personnel, stress levels between women and men will be similar, but for non-military personnel, women will have higher stress than men. Furthermore, younger military personnel (18 to 40) will have more stress than older military personnel (greater than 40). Data collection will take place February and March of 2016.