Dominican University of California
 

All Conference Presentations, Performances and Exhibits

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-14-2016 7:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 8:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

William Phillips, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The purpose of social media is to share information and connect with other users online. In recent years, extensive social media use has begun to emerge among users and can be related to increased time on social media outlets. Increased time on social media platforms has raised concern about a new phenomenon called the Fear of Missing out (FoMO; Przybylski, Murayamab, DeHaanc, and Gladwelld, 2013). FoMO is defined by an individual’s anxiety or worry that other people are having more rewarding experiences than they are. FoMO is characterized by an increased desire to constantly stay connected with online friends on social media in order to see what others are experiencing. Przybylski et al. examined university student’s FoMO levels and participant Facebook use in educational settings. Researchers found that participant’s FoMO scores were related to increased rates of Facebook use. The purpose of the present study is to examine FoMO rates and emotional stability (neuroticism) in college students that engage in extensive social media use. Participants (n=100) will be solicited online using Facebook. Participants will be sent a link to complete an online survey containing demographic questions regarding age, gender, level of educations and ethnicity. The survey will also contain social media use questions that aim to measure how much the participant engages with others on different social media platforms. Finally, participants will complete two scales, the Fear of Missing Out Scale and the Emotional Stability sub scale of the International Personality Item Pool (Goldberg 1992). It is hypothesized that a) participants that use social media extensively will score higher on the FoMO scale, b) participants who score higher on the FoMO scale will also score higher on the emotional stability scale, and c) Freshman year students are more likely to experience higher rates of FoMO than senior students. Data collection for this study will occur in February and March of 2016.

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Apr 14th, 7:00 PM Apr 14th, 8:00 PM

Fear of Missing Out in Relationship to Emotional Stability and Social Media Use

Guzman Lecture Hall

The purpose of social media is to share information and connect with other users online. In recent years, extensive social media use has begun to emerge among users and can be related to increased time on social media outlets. Increased time on social media platforms has raised concern about a new phenomenon called the Fear of Missing out (FoMO; Przybylski, Murayamab, DeHaanc, and Gladwelld, 2013). FoMO is defined by an individual’s anxiety or worry that other people are having more rewarding experiences than they are. FoMO is characterized by an increased desire to constantly stay connected with online friends on social media in order to see what others are experiencing. Przybylski et al. examined university student’s FoMO levels and participant Facebook use in educational settings. Researchers found that participant’s FoMO scores were related to increased rates of Facebook use. The purpose of the present study is to examine FoMO rates and emotional stability (neuroticism) in college students that engage in extensive social media use. Participants (n=100) will be solicited online using Facebook. Participants will be sent a link to complete an online survey containing demographic questions regarding age, gender, level of educations and ethnicity. The survey will also contain social media use questions that aim to measure how much the participant engages with others on different social media platforms. Finally, participants will complete two scales, the Fear of Missing Out Scale and the Emotional Stability sub scale of the International Personality Item Pool (Goldberg 1992). It is hypothesized that a) participants that use social media extensively will score higher on the FoMO scale, b) participants who score higher on the FoMO scale will also score higher on the emotional stability scale, and c) Freshman year students are more likely to experience higher rates of FoMO than senior students. Data collection for this study will occur in February and March of 2016.