Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

Gender Bias and the Evaluation of Supervisors

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-14-2016 7:00 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 8:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Emily Newton, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Gender equality is an issue that has been at the forefront of social justice conversations in the U.S. for decades. The accomplishments of our modern world marks just how far society has come since the United States ratified the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Unfortunately, the battle for full gender equality has not yet been won. According to a Gallup poll, the majority of supervisors and bosses in America today are male (Riffkin, 2014). Prior research has been done to evaluate whether the population prefers male or female bosses and has shown that overall, we prefer males (Powell, 2015). This study assesses how participants evaluate their supervisor's personality which will give us the opportunity to better understand why America prefers male bosses. The purpose of this study is to determine if gender has any influence on subordinate’s evaluations of their supervisors. Approximately 80 participants will be recruited through social media and from Dominican University of California’s classrooms. Through SurveyMonkey, participants will evaluate their supervisors using an adapted version of Hofmann & Jones Measure of Collective Personality (Hofmann & Jones 2005). Using a 5-point likert scale, the survey asks participants to rate their supervisors similarity to terms related to the “Big Five” personality dimensions - agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, extraversion, and openness. It is predicted that (I) male participants will rate their male supervisors higher (higher meaning positive) than their female supervisors on 3 out of 5 personality dimensions - agreeableness, emotional stability, and extraversion and (II) female participants will give higher ratings to their female supervisors on 4 out of 5 personality dimensions - emotional stability, conscientiousness, openness, and agreeability. Participants will also be asked to provide demographic information on their gender, age, their supervisor’s gender, and their gender field of work. The data collection and completion of this study will occur in May of 2016.

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Apr 14th, 7:00 PM Apr 14th, 8:00 PM

Gender Bias and the Evaluation of Supervisors

Guzman Lecture Hall

Gender equality is an issue that has been at the forefront of social justice conversations in the U.S. for decades. The accomplishments of our modern world marks just how far society has come since the United States ratified the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Unfortunately, the battle for full gender equality has not yet been won. According to a Gallup poll, the majority of supervisors and bosses in America today are male (Riffkin, 2014). Prior research has been done to evaluate whether the population prefers male or female bosses and has shown that overall, we prefer males (Powell, 2015). This study assesses how participants evaluate their supervisor's personality which will give us the opportunity to better understand why America prefers male bosses. The purpose of this study is to determine if gender has any influence on subordinate’s evaluations of their supervisors. Approximately 80 participants will be recruited through social media and from Dominican University of California’s classrooms. Through SurveyMonkey, participants will evaluate their supervisors using an adapted version of Hofmann & Jones Measure of Collective Personality (Hofmann & Jones 2005). Using a 5-point likert scale, the survey asks participants to rate their supervisors similarity to terms related to the “Big Five” personality dimensions - agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, extraversion, and openness. It is predicted that (I) male participants will rate their male supervisors higher (higher meaning positive) than their female supervisors on 3 out of 5 personality dimensions - agreeableness, emotional stability, and extraversion and (II) female participants will give higher ratings to their female supervisors on 4 out of 5 personality dimensions - emotional stability, conscientiousness, openness, and agreeability. Participants will also be asked to provide demographic information on their gender, age, their supervisor’s gender, and their gender field of work. The data collection and completion of this study will occur in May of 2016.