Dominican University of California
 

All Conference Presentations, Performances and Exhibits

Cultural influences to Pain Assessment and Pain interventions: Perspectives of Physicians, Nurses and Family Members on Care Management of Children

Alexandra J. Wynkoop, Dominican University of California

pain, cultures, pediatric, factors, children, health, patients

Abstract/Description

Pain is a multi layered experience which is influenced by many factors, including religion, culture, and past experiences connected with pain. It is known that pain is unique to the individual experiencing it and is to be taken seriously and not questioned or doubted by health care providers. Preventing pain recognition in children who are sick is an essential task for doctors and nurses. The aim of this paper is to identify pediatric patients’ different pain perceptions and behavioral manifestations among various cultures, as well as analyze health care providers pain assessment and pain management among different cultures.

Purpose: Nurses must be vigilant in cultural factors that influence pain in children. This critique will analyze various studies in order to understand the effect that cultural backgrounds of young children have on nurses and physicians ability to efficiently and unbiasedly assess pain and provide pain interventions to pediatric patients.

Findings: Findings ranged from the association between pediatricians’ attitudes about treatment recommendations in different races, to how family members of children from different cultures viewed pain, to how certain races complained of more pain after treatment then others, to how children of different cultures interpret their own pain. One significant finding identified in the research is how pain expressed in minority races is under treated.

Clinical Relevance: In order to improve pain management in pediatric patients, culturally sensitive pain assessments are necessary to competently treat pain in children.

 
Apr 14th, 7:00 PM Apr 14th, 8:00 PM

Cultural influences to Pain Assessment and Pain interventions: Perspectives of Physicians, Nurses and Family Members on Care Management of Children

Guzman Lecture Hall

Pain is a multi layered experience which is influenced by many factors, including religion, culture, and past experiences connected with pain. It is known that pain is unique to the individual experiencing it and is to be taken seriously and not questioned or doubted by health care providers. Preventing pain recognition in children who are sick is an essential task for doctors and nurses. The aim of this paper is to identify pediatric patients’ different pain perceptions and behavioral manifestations among various cultures, as well as analyze health care providers pain assessment and pain management among different cultures.

Purpose: Nurses must be vigilant in cultural factors that influence pain in children. This critique will analyze various studies in order to understand the effect that cultural backgrounds of young children have on nurses and physicians ability to efficiently and unbiasedly assess pain and provide pain interventions to pediatric patients.

Findings: Findings ranged from the association between pediatricians’ attitudes about treatment recommendations in different races, to how family members of children from different cultures viewed pain, to how certain races complained of more pain after treatment then others, to how children of different cultures interpret their own pain. One significant finding identified in the research is how pain expressed in minority races is under treated.

Clinical Relevance: In order to improve pain management in pediatric patients, culturally sensitive pain assessments are necessary to competently treat pain in children.