Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on the Development of Obesity in Elementary School Children

Location

Guzman 113

Start Date

4-14-2016 6:30 PM

End Date

4-14-2016 7:00 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor

Luanne Linnard-Palmer, RN, MSN, OCN

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

America, known for the signature Big Mac, has been deemed one of the top countries with the most overweight and obese citizens, including children. “Obesity in childhood now affects 17% of American children and is associated with life-threatening and costly health consequences that start in childhood and persist into adulthood” (Cluss, 2013, p. 1). Along with the increased rate of obesity, the number of overweight children has increased significantly, almost tripled since 1970 (Birbilis, Moschonis, & Mougios, 2013). In regards to the body mass index (BMI) of overweight American children and adolescents, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have categorized them to be in the 85th and 95th percentile on pediatric growth charts. This may be due to the low cost and easy accessibility to fast food; as some people may not be aware of what exactly they are consuming. “Low socioeconomic status may influence a variety of factors including health insurance; neighborhood and personal safety; local schools and their resources; local food stores and the extent to which they carry healthful foods; the price of the food; private and public transportation; proclivity to watch television and participation in other sedentary activities; subsidized local, state, and federal programs; and access to gyms and health clubs” (Vieweg, Johnston, & Lanier, 2007, p. 11). With a deficit in finances, resources, and knowledge, lower socioeconomic class families face many hardships when it comes to eating a healthy meal and are therefore greatly impacted by the disease obesity.

This study is undertaken to assess the nutritional knowledge and dietary habits of parents of lower socioeconomic class in the Hispanic-dominant Marin Canal area and to see whether there is a correlation to childhood obesity. Parents of lower socioeconomic class may not be as aware of what comprises a healthy lifestyle and are considered to live in areas with limited resources to healthy foods and limited funds to buy these healthy foods. With this limited amount of knowledge and resources, this may directly affect what the children of these families eat, contributing to unhealthy eating habits and childhood obesity.

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Apr 14th, 6:30 PM Apr 14th, 7:00 PM

The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on the Development of Obesity in Elementary School Children

Guzman 113

America, known for the signature Big Mac, has been deemed one of the top countries with the most overweight and obese citizens, including children. “Obesity in childhood now affects 17% of American children and is associated with life-threatening and costly health consequences that start in childhood and persist into adulthood” (Cluss, 2013, p. 1). Along with the increased rate of obesity, the number of overweight children has increased significantly, almost tripled since 1970 (Birbilis, Moschonis, & Mougios, 2013). In regards to the body mass index (BMI) of overweight American children and adolescents, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have categorized them to be in the 85th and 95th percentile on pediatric growth charts. This may be due to the low cost and easy accessibility to fast food; as some people may not be aware of what exactly they are consuming. “Low socioeconomic status may influence a variety of factors including health insurance; neighborhood and personal safety; local schools and their resources; local food stores and the extent to which they carry healthful foods; the price of the food; private and public transportation; proclivity to watch television and participation in other sedentary activities; subsidized local, state, and federal programs; and access to gyms and health clubs” (Vieweg, Johnston, & Lanier, 2007, p. 11). With a deficit in finances, resources, and knowledge, lower socioeconomic class families face many hardships when it comes to eating a healthy meal and are therefore greatly impacted by the disease obesity.

This study is undertaken to assess the nutritional knowledge and dietary habits of parents of lower socioeconomic class in the Hispanic-dominant Marin Canal area and to see whether there is a correlation to childhood obesity. Parents of lower socioeconomic class may not be as aware of what comprises a healthy lifestyle and are considered to live in areas with limited resources to healthy foods and limited funds to buy these healthy foods. With this limited amount of knowledge and resources, this may directly affect what the children of these families eat, contributing to unhealthy eating habits and childhood obesity.