Dominican University of California
 

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Presentation or Panel Title

Attachment Styles and Romantic Relationship Satisfaction

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-15-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-15-2016 3:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Adult Degree Completion Student

Faculty Mentor

Emily Newton, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

According to Hazan and Shaver (1997) the emotional bond that develops between adult romantic partners is a part of the same motivational system and emotional bond that is created between infants and their caregivers - the attachment behavioral system. A number of studies have looked at an attachment approach in close relationships by examining the relations among the three attachment styles (avoidant, anxious / ambivalent and secure) and relationship satisfaction. Secure individuals tend to report greater levels of relationship satisfaction than those who report a non-secure attachment style. The purpose of this study is to focus on attachment styles within romantic relationships and further explore how they impact relationship satisfaction. I will also be including a fourth attachment style, dismissive. I intend to see if this style is as relevant as the other more common attachment styles, as minimal past research has been done to study this. One hundred participants, who are currently involved in a romantic relationship, will be recruited from Dominican University of California. They will be invited to participate in an online survey through surveymonkey.com on the topic of romantic relationship satisfaction and respond to demographic questions regarding age, gender, and relationship status. This will be followed by four questions from The Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991) that measures adult attachment style, and then seven questions from The Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendricks, 1988) that measures relationship satisfaction. It is hypothesized that those who are classified as securely attached on The Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew and Horowitz, 1991) will score higher on the Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendricks, 1988) than those who classify themselves as having a dismissive, preoccupied, or fearful attachment style. It is also hypothesized that men will more often classify themselves as having a secure attachment style, and experience greater relationship satisfaction than females. Data collection and completion for this study will occur in April of 2016.

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Apr 15th, 2:30 PM Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

Attachment Styles and Romantic Relationship Satisfaction

Guzman Lecture Hall

According to Hazan and Shaver (1997) the emotional bond that develops between adult romantic partners is a part of the same motivational system and emotional bond that is created between infants and their caregivers - the attachment behavioral system. A number of studies have looked at an attachment approach in close relationships by examining the relations among the three attachment styles (avoidant, anxious / ambivalent and secure) and relationship satisfaction. Secure individuals tend to report greater levels of relationship satisfaction than those who report a non-secure attachment style. The purpose of this study is to focus on attachment styles within romantic relationships and further explore how they impact relationship satisfaction. I will also be including a fourth attachment style, dismissive. I intend to see if this style is as relevant as the other more common attachment styles, as minimal past research has been done to study this. One hundred participants, who are currently involved in a romantic relationship, will be recruited from Dominican University of California. They will be invited to participate in an online survey through surveymonkey.com on the topic of romantic relationship satisfaction and respond to demographic questions regarding age, gender, and relationship status. This will be followed by four questions from The Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991) that measures adult attachment style, and then seven questions from The Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendricks, 1988) that measures relationship satisfaction. It is hypothesized that those who are classified as securely attached on The Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew and Horowitz, 1991) will score higher on the Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendricks, 1988) than those who classify themselves as having a dismissive, preoccupied, or fearful attachment style. It is also hypothesized that men will more often classify themselves as having a secure attachment style, and experience greater relationship satisfaction than females. Data collection and completion for this study will occur in April of 2016.