Dominican University of California
 

All Conference Presentations, Performances and Exhibits

Oral Contraception use in Adolescent Hispanics: knowledge, parent’s reaction to use, pregnancy rates and compliance/adherence.

Kristen Y. Montesinos, Dominican University of California

Abstract/Description

Women take oral contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. Oral contraceptives are either estrogen or progestin; available in combination or progestin-only form. Oral contraceptives work by keeping the women’s egg from leaving the ovaries and thickening cervical mucus. There is confusion regarding how effective (97-99%) oral contraceptives are. Combination pills work best when they are taken daily, whereas progestin-only pills are taken at the same time every day to ensure that hormone levels are maintained.

Reports show that 61.9% of all women ages 15-44 in the United States currently use some form of contraceptives, (Garcés-Palacio, et al, 2008). The use of contraceptives was not uniform across all race and ethnicities. Hispanics comprise the largest minority group in America, yet are less likely to use contraceptives in comparison to other races and ethnicities. Nurses must explore why the use of contraception is low among those with high fertility and high unintended pregnancy rates (Werth, S.R., et al, 2015).

The Hispanic community has an estimated 51% of teens getting pregnant at least once before the age of 20; twice the national average. Adolescents’ reported that hormonal birth control could cause permanent sterility, birth defects and health issues. (Rivera, P.C., et al, 2007). The aim of this project is to investigate the use of oral contraceptive in the Hispanic adolescent community including viewpoints of Hispanic adolescents’ on contraceptive use (compliance/adherence), knowledge of oral contraceptive use, parent’s reaction to use, and adolescent pregnancy rates.

Keywords: Oral Contraception, Hispanic, Adolescents, pregnancy rates, knowledge

 
Apr 15th, 2:30 PM Apr 15th, 3:30 PM

Oral Contraception use in Adolescent Hispanics: knowledge, parent’s reaction to use, pregnancy rates and compliance/adherence.

Guzman Lecture Hall

Women take oral contraceptives to prevent pregnancy. Oral contraceptives are either estrogen or progestin; available in combination or progestin-only form. Oral contraceptives work by keeping the women’s egg from leaving the ovaries and thickening cervical mucus. There is confusion regarding how effective (97-99%) oral contraceptives are. Combination pills work best when they are taken daily, whereas progestin-only pills are taken at the same time every day to ensure that hormone levels are maintained.

Reports show that 61.9% of all women ages 15-44 in the United States currently use some form of contraceptives, (Garcés-Palacio, et al, 2008). The use of contraceptives was not uniform across all race and ethnicities. Hispanics comprise the largest minority group in America, yet are less likely to use contraceptives in comparison to other races and ethnicities. Nurses must explore why the use of contraception is low among those with high fertility and high unintended pregnancy rates (Werth, S.R., et al, 2015).

The Hispanic community has an estimated 51% of teens getting pregnant at least once before the age of 20; twice the national average. Adolescents’ reported that hormonal birth control could cause permanent sterility, birth defects and health issues. (Rivera, P.C., et al, 2007). The aim of this project is to investigate the use of oral contraceptive in the Hispanic adolescent community including viewpoints of Hispanic adolescents’ on contraceptive use (compliance/adherence), knowledge of oral contraceptive use, parent’s reaction to use, and adolescent pregnancy rates.

Keywords: Oral Contraception, Hispanic, Adolescents, pregnancy rates, knowledge