Dominican University of California
 

Poster Presentations - Guzman Lecture Hall

Presentation or Panel Title

Effects of Birth Control on Fertility

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #9

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:30 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:30 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Luanne Linnard-Palmer

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

On March 3, 1873, Congress passed a new law that defined contraceptives as obscene and illicit and made it a federal offense to distribute birth control through the mail or past state lines. In 1938 the Federal ban on birth control was lifted. By 1960 the first oral contraceptive, Enovid, was approved by the Federal Drug and Food Administration as a contraceptive. This began the trend of women readily using birth control.

Because of this popularity, women may tend to assume that contraceptives are safe to use. The original pill was associated with negative cardiovascular effects. Presently, hormonal content has been significantly reduced and the safety concerns have diminished. Not only that, but manufacturers have reported that there are many health benefits to be had by taking them such as reduction in cancers of both the endometrium and ovary.

There are also risk factors associated with their use such as an increase in the risk of development of a thromboembolism, an increase in stroke risk, the development of cervical or breast cancer, and cardiac episodes among smokers (Bryden, p. 223).

There are different types of birth control methods to include the birth control pill, the Depo-Provera shot, the implant and the copper intrauterine device (IUD). Fertility issues have surfaced to be a concern when women take one of the above forms of birth control. With current infertility rates at 11.9% or 7.4 million women, further investigation on delayed fertility or true infertility is warranted.

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Apr 23rd, 6:30 PM Apr 23rd, 7:30 PM

Effects of Birth Control on Fertility

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #9

On March 3, 1873, Congress passed a new law that defined contraceptives as obscene and illicit and made it a federal offense to distribute birth control through the mail or past state lines. In 1938 the Federal ban on birth control was lifted. By 1960 the first oral contraceptive, Enovid, was approved by the Federal Drug and Food Administration as a contraceptive. This began the trend of women readily using birth control.

Because of this popularity, women may tend to assume that contraceptives are safe to use. The original pill was associated with negative cardiovascular effects. Presently, hormonal content has been significantly reduced and the safety concerns have diminished. Not only that, but manufacturers have reported that there are many health benefits to be had by taking them such as reduction in cancers of both the endometrium and ovary.

There are also risk factors associated with their use such as an increase in the risk of development of a thromboembolism, an increase in stroke risk, the development of cervical or breast cancer, and cardiac episodes among smokers (Bryden, p. 223).

There are different types of birth control methods to include the birth control pill, the Depo-Provera shot, the implant and the copper intrauterine device (IUD). Fertility issues have surfaced to be a concern when women take one of the above forms of birth control. With current infertility rates at 11.9% or 7.4 million women, further investigation on delayed fertility or true infertility is warranted.