Dominican University of California
 

Poster Presentations - Guzman Lecture Hall

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #8

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:30 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

William Phillips

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

When athletes are injured, they are faced with the initial injury stage, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and then the return-to-sport. When athletes have a negative outlook, they are less likely to recover from the injury at the proposed date of return-to-sport, take a longer span of time to recover, and have higher levels of stress and anxiety. Wadey, Podlog, Hall, Hamson-Utley, Hicks-Little, & Hammer, (2014) examined the dimensions of reinjury anxiety and found athletes with greater reinjury anxiety were in denial of the severity of their injury by wishing things would get better and had a greater focus on their distress. Significant indirect effects for coping were found for wishful thinking, venting of emotions, denial, and behavioral disengagement (Wadey et al., 2014). The purpose of the present study is to examine reinjury anxiety and return-to-sport outcomes within college students. Participants (n=100) solicited from Dominican University and different social networks will be sent an email containing the Reinjury Anxiety Inventory (Walker, Thatcher & Lavallee, 2010), the Return to Sport After Serious Injury Questionnaire (Podlog & Eklund, 2005) and demographic items including type of injury and sport. These questionnaires measure the level of reinjury anxiety and if the perspective of the injury is positive or negative. It is hypothesized: 1) Those with greater reinjury anxiety will be kept out of their sport longer than those who experience less reinjury anxiety and negative thoughts, 2) It will take the participants with greater anxiety longer to recover, and 3) With a negative attitude, personal perspective of actual length of injury will be skewed. Participants with a negative perspective will have higher anxiety with their injury versus participants with a more positive perspective. Data collection will begin approximately in February 2015.

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Apr 23rd, 6:30 PM Apr 23rd, 7:30 PM

Re-injury Anxiety & Return-to-Sport Outcomes in College Students

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #8

When athletes are injured, they are faced with the initial injury stage, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and then the return-to-sport. When athletes have a negative outlook, they are less likely to recover from the injury at the proposed date of return-to-sport, take a longer span of time to recover, and have higher levels of stress and anxiety. Wadey, Podlog, Hall, Hamson-Utley, Hicks-Little, & Hammer, (2014) examined the dimensions of reinjury anxiety and found athletes with greater reinjury anxiety were in denial of the severity of their injury by wishing things would get better and had a greater focus on their distress. Significant indirect effects for coping were found for wishful thinking, venting of emotions, denial, and behavioral disengagement (Wadey et al., 2014). The purpose of the present study is to examine reinjury anxiety and return-to-sport outcomes within college students. Participants (n=100) solicited from Dominican University and different social networks will be sent an email containing the Reinjury Anxiety Inventory (Walker, Thatcher & Lavallee, 2010), the Return to Sport After Serious Injury Questionnaire (Podlog & Eklund, 2005) and demographic items including type of injury and sport. These questionnaires measure the level of reinjury anxiety and if the perspective of the injury is positive or negative. It is hypothesized: 1) Those with greater reinjury anxiety will be kept out of their sport longer than those who experience less reinjury anxiety and negative thoughts, 2) It will take the participants with greater anxiety longer to recover, and 3) With a negative attitude, personal perspective of actual length of injury will be skewed. Participants with a negative perspective will have higher anxiety with their injury versus participants with a more positive perspective. Data collection will begin approximately in February 2015.