Dominican University of California
 

Poster Presentations - Guzman Lecture Hall

Presentation or Panel Title

The Relationship Between the Impostor Phenomenon, Personality Traits, and Parental Rearing Style

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #8

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Afshin Gharib

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The impostor phenomenon (IP) refers to feelings among successful people that they do not deserve their success. Despite objective evidence of success, these individuals feel "phony" and believe that they have managed to fool the people around them. These individuals may feel incompetent despite contradicting evidence. IP has been found to have a relationship to depression, a lack of self confidence, anxiety, and frustration due to an inability to meet their personal standards (Clance & Imes, 1978). In addition, the individual may feel they need to be perfect, may have a fear of failure, may have a fear of success, and may even have guilt about success. Additionally, past research has shown relationships between parental rearing style, certain personality styles such as Neuroticism, Conscientiousness, and Extraversion. Bernard, Dollinger, and Ramaniah (2002), conducted a study with the goal of relating the impostor phenomenon to the Five-factor model of personality. A sample of 190 college students completed the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (CIPS), the Perceived Fraudulence Scale (PFS), and the NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised. Results showed no difference between the sexes on IP. For both men and women, high Neuroticism and Low Conscientiousness were related with high IP scores. Neuroticism was shown to be the best predictor of IP scores. Also, self-reported GPA was unrelated to IP. The correlation between the IP composite score and self-reported hours of study per week was negative. Additionally, there was a negative correlation between Conscientiousness and IP. The present study is investigating further on the relationship between IP, the personality traits of Agreeableness and Neuroticism, and parental rearing style. Participants will be approximately 30 students recruited from University classrooms and a convenience sample of approximately 50 individuals who will be recruited through social network sites. Participants in this study will be asked to fill out an online survey that includes demographic information, The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (Clance, 1985), The Parental Bonding Instrument (Gladstone & Parker, 2005), and The Big Five Questionnaire (Brown & Maydeu-Olivares, 2011). Although data collection and analysis will not be completed until February 2015, it is predicted that participants who demonstrate higher levels of IP will be more likely to have higher levels of nurturing parental care. Higher levels of both Agreeableness and Neuroticism, as measured by the Big Five Questionnaire, will be positively correlated with IP.

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

The Relationship Between the Impostor Phenomenon, Personality Traits, and Parental Rearing Style

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #8

The impostor phenomenon (IP) refers to feelings among successful people that they do not deserve their success. Despite objective evidence of success, these individuals feel "phony" and believe that they have managed to fool the people around them. These individuals may feel incompetent despite contradicting evidence. IP has been found to have a relationship to depression, a lack of self confidence, anxiety, and frustration due to an inability to meet their personal standards (Clance & Imes, 1978). In addition, the individual may feel they need to be perfect, may have a fear of failure, may have a fear of success, and may even have guilt about success. Additionally, past research has shown relationships between parental rearing style, certain personality styles such as Neuroticism, Conscientiousness, and Extraversion. Bernard, Dollinger, and Ramaniah (2002), conducted a study with the goal of relating the impostor phenomenon to the Five-factor model of personality. A sample of 190 college students completed the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (CIPS), the Perceived Fraudulence Scale (PFS), and the NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised. Results showed no difference between the sexes on IP. For both men and women, high Neuroticism and Low Conscientiousness were related with high IP scores. Neuroticism was shown to be the best predictor of IP scores. Also, self-reported GPA was unrelated to IP. The correlation between the IP composite score and self-reported hours of study per week was negative. Additionally, there was a negative correlation between Conscientiousness and IP. The present study is investigating further on the relationship between IP, the personality traits of Agreeableness and Neuroticism, and parental rearing style. Participants will be approximately 30 students recruited from University classrooms and a convenience sample of approximately 50 individuals who will be recruited through social network sites. Participants in this study will be asked to fill out an online survey that includes demographic information, The Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (Clance, 1985), The Parental Bonding Instrument (Gladstone & Parker, 2005), and The Big Five Questionnaire (Brown & Maydeu-Olivares, 2011). Although data collection and analysis will not be completed until February 2015, it is predicted that participants who demonstrate higher levels of IP will be more likely to have higher levels of nurturing parental care. Higher levels of both Agreeableness and Neuroticism, as measured by the Big Five Questionnaire, will be positively correlated with IP.