Dominican University of California
 

Poster Presentations - Guzman Lecture Hall

Presentation or Panel Title

The Relationship Among Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Big 5 Personality Among Residential Counselors

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #19

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:30 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Adult Degree Completion Student

Faculty Mentor

William Phillips

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

For those who have experience working in residential treatment centers, it is a known fact that there is a high turnover with the staff that work face to face with clients. The high turnaround is likely because of the high burnout rate among staff, typically because of the stressful and demanding environment of dealing with some demanding clients. The profession of child and youth care is considered one of the most difficult and emotionally exhausting careers in the human service industry (Krueger, 2002.)

The purpose of the present study is to further evidence regarding job satisfaction and burnout focusing on how a staff’s personality traits may alter their likelihood for burnout and how satisfied they are with their job. Participants (n=50) will be recruited from the staff at 6 residential treatment centers by an email sent by Human Resources. The email will contain a link to a survey containing the Professional Quality of Life Scale (Stamm, 2009), the Employee Satisfaction Measure (Jung & Yoon, 2013), and the Mini IPIP Scale (Donnellan, Oswald, Fredrick, Baird & Lucas, 2006). The participants will be asked roughly 66 questions in total as well as a few demographic and job related questions. This study will further current findings of how job satisfaction and burnout is affected by personality traits. It is hypothesized that 1) a staff with a more agreeable personality will be less likely for burnout and have a higher job satisfaction than a staff that has scored more neurotic. 2) A staff that is more open to experiences will be more likely to burnout and have a lower job satisfaction than a staff that is conscientious. And 3) a staff who is extraverted will have a higher job satisfaction and be less likely for burnout. Data collection for this study will take place in February/March of 2015.

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Apr 23rd, 6:30 PM Apr 23rd, 7:30 PM

The Relationship Among Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Big 5 Personality Among Residential Counselors

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #19

For those who have experience working in residential treatment centers, it is a known fact that there is a high turnover with the staff that work face to face with clients. The high turnaround is likely because of the high burnout rate among staff, typically because of the stressful and demanding environment of dealing with some demanding clients. The profession of child and youth care is considered one of the most difficult and emotionally exhausting careers in the human service industry (Krueger, 2002.)

The purpose of the present study is to further evidence regarding job satisfaction and burnout focusing on how a staff’s personality traits may alter their likelihood for burnout and how satisfied they are with their job. Participants (n=50) will be recruited from the staff at 6 residential treatment centers by an email sent by Human Resources. The email will contain a link to a survey containing the Professional Quality of Life Scale (Stamm, 2009), the Employee Satisfaction Measure (Jung & Yoon, 2013), and the Mini IPIP Scale (Donnellan, Oswald, Fredrick, Baird & Lucas, 2006). The participants will be asked roughly 66 questions in total as well as a few demographic and job related questions. This study will further current findings of how job satisfaction and burnout is affected by personality traits. It is hypothesized that 1) a staff with a more agreeable personality will be less likely for burnout and have a higher job satisfaction than a staff that has scored more neurotic. 2) A staff that is more open to experiences will be more likely to burnout and have a lower job satisfaction than a staff that is conscientious. And 3) a staff who is extraverted will have a higher job satisfaction and be less likely for burnout. Data collection for this study will take place in February/March of 2015.