Dominican University of California
 

Poster Presentations - Guzman Lecture Hall

Presentation or Panel Title

The Effect of Aggression and Performance on Home Field Advantage

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #14

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:30 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

William Phillips

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Home field advantage occurs in sports, especially in team sports. Evidence has been reported that teams playing at their home field have a statistical advantage winning 60% of their home contests (Neave & Wolfson 2003). An evolutionary theory suggests increased performance at home is the result of increased testosterone which leads to aggression for defending ones territory (Neave & Wolfson 2003). Neave & Wolfson conducted an experiment to investigate testosterone, territoriality, in regard to home field advantage in soccer. The analysis was of 30 countries’ international games. The study also examined relationships between testosterone and performance. The results indicated that salivary testosterone levels in male soccer players vary as function of the venue before a competitive match, levels being significantly higher before a home than an away game or a training session. The purpose of the present study will examine the effect of home and away games on aggression and performance by taking game statistics of the sporting event and having the athletes complete a survey an hour before competition. Participants (n=26) from the men’s and women’s Dominican University basketball teams will be taking the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale. Participants will be asked 12 questions that measure competitiveness and aggression. It is hypothesized that 1) the athletes playing at home will be more aggressive 2) Male’s aggression scores will be higher than female’s aggression scores 3) At home athletes will have a statistically better performance than away. Data collection for this study will take place during the Dominican University men’s and women’s basketball 2014-2015 season.

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Apr 23rd, 6:30 PM Apr 23rd, 7:30 PM

The Effect of Aggression and Performance on Home Field Advantage

Guzman Lecture Hall Poster #14

Home field advantage occurs in sports, especially in team sports. Evidence has been reported that teams playing at their home field have a statistical advantage winning 60% of their home contests (Neave & Wolfson 2003). An evolutionary theory suggests increased performance at home is the result of increased testosterone which leads to aggression for defending ones territory (Neave & Wolfson 2003). Neave & Wolfson conducted an experiment to investigate testosterone, territoriality, in regard to home field advantage in soccer. The analysis was of 30 countries’ international games. The study also examined relationships between testosterone and performance. The results indicated that salivary testosterone levels in male soccer players vary as function of the venue before a competitive match, levels being significantly higher before a home than an away game or a training session. The purpose of the present study will examine the effect of home and away games on aggression and performance by taking game statistics of the sporting event and having the athletes complete a survey an hour before competition. Participants (n=26) from the men’s and women’s Dominican University basketball teams will be taking the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale. Participants will be asked 12 questions that measure competitiveness and aggression. It is hypothesized that 1) the athletes playing at home will be more aggressive 2) Male’s aggression scores will be higher than female’s aggression scores 3) At home athletes will have a statistically better performance than away. Data collection for this study will take place during the Dominican University men’s and women’s basketball 2014-2015 season.