Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 307

Location

Guzman 307

Start Date

4-24-2015 12:40 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:55 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne Peters Ed.D

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Early Intervention promotes preschool age children, identified on the autism spectrum, with increased independence and positive social skills in the classroom. Preschool children who do not have access to such programs tend to display negative and socially inappropriate behavior, such as acts of aggression, withdrawal, and inability to attend to lessons. Lovaas as cited in Eikeseth and Smith (2011) is referred to as the pioneer of Early Intervention, who dedicated almost fifty years of his life to improving the lives of families among the autism community. Lovaas’ studies were the first documented to indicate that children who received early intensive intervention made dramatic gains in development (Eikeseth & Smith, 2011). Studies on program effectiveness documented that preschool-age children who received Early Intervention scored higher on IQ, language comprehension, imitation, expressive language, nonverbal communication, play, stereotyped behaviors and adaptive functioning compared to children who did not receive Early Intervention (Eikeseth, et. al, 2012).

The literature reveals that children who receive Early Intervention maintain successful relationships with peers through joint-attention, display increased use of appropriate language, as well as demonstrate an interest in participating in group classroom activities (Eldevik, et. al, 2012). The purpose of the study is to analyze data on children who receive Early Intervention and children who do not receive Early Intervention with a focus on the factors of independence and positive social skills.

Eikeseth, S., Klintwall, L., Jahr, E., & Karlsson, P. (2012). Outcome for children with autism receiving early and intensive behavioral intervention in mainstream preschool and kindergarten settings. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 6, 829-835.

Eldevik, S., Hastings, R., Jahr, E., & Hughes, J. (2012). Outcomes of behavioral intervention for children with autism in mainstream pre-school settings. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 42(2), 210-220.

Smith, T., & Eikeseth, S. (2011). O. Ivar Lovaas: Pioneer of applied behavior analysis and intervention for children with autism.Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 41(3), 375-378.

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Apr 24th, 12:40 PM Apr 24th, 12:55 PM

Analysis of Data on the Effect of Early Intervention for Children on the Autism Spectrum

Guzman 307

Early Intervention promotes preschool age children, identified on the autism spectrum, with increased independence and positive social skills in the classroom. Preschool children who do not have access to such programs tend to display negative and socially inappropriate behavior, such as acts of aggression, withdrawal, and inability to attend to lessons. Lovaas as cited in Eikeseth and Smith (2011) is referred to as the pioneer of Early Intervention, who dedicated almost fifty years of his life to improving the lives of families among the autism community. Lovaas’ studies were the first documented to indicate that children who received early intensive intervention made dramatic gains in development (Eikeseth & Smith, 2011). Studies on program effectiveness documented that preschool-age children who received Early Intervention scored higher on IQ, language comprehension, imitation, expressive language, nonverbal communication, play, stereotyped behaviors and adaptive functioning compared to children who did not receive Early Intervention (Eikeseth, et. al, 2012).

The literature reveals that children who receive Early Intervention maintain successful relationships with peers through joint-attention, display increased use of appropriate language, as well as demonstrate an interest in participating in group classroom activities (Eldevik, et. al, 2012). The purpose of the study is to analyze data on children who receive Early Intervention and children who do not receive Early Intervention with a focus on the factors of independence and positive social skills.

Eikeseth, S., Klintwall, L., Jahr, E., & Karlsson, P. (2012). Outcome for children with autism receiving early and intensive behavioral intervention in mainstream preschool and kindergarten settings. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 6, 829-835.

Eldevik, S., Hastings, R., Jahr, E., & Hughes, J. (2012). Outcomes of behavioral intervention for children with autism in mainstream pre-school settings. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 42(2), 210-220.

Smith, T., & Eikeseth, S. (2011). O. Ivar Lovaas: Pioneer of applied behavior analysis and intervention for children with autism.Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 41(3), 375-378.