Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 307

Location

Guzman 307

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:00 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 6:15 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne Peters, EDD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Despite federal and state investments in early education intervention programs, achievement gaps continue to afflict the education system with children from low-income families having a greater need of a high quality preschool education. When children from poor families move through the education system starting off behind, the chances of academic success becomes increasingly difficult, as the education gap increases year after year and they fall farther behind. By the time these students enter high school, they are so far behind they are unable to catch up and meet the grade level requirements, causing many of them to give up and quit attending school, leading to an increase in the dropout rate.

Research shows if high quality interventions are made during the preschool years, the gap will be minimized and disadvantaged students will be provided with lasting benefits in language, literacy, social and academic skills. These skills that they are provided with early on carry through into adolescence, leading to a more successful educational experience allowing for more students to graduate with a high school diploma, and ultimately decreasing the dropout out rate in the community.

The importance of preschool in building social skills and school readiness by offering public preschool to low-income families, not only benefits the individual child and the families who attend, but it also benefits the local communities and ultimately our society as a whole. Families who cannot afford to pay for preschool have children entering kindergarten with privileged children who are already familiar with class structure, daily routines, socializing with peers, and who have experienced an introduction to academics. Children of low-income families have not had the chance to practice or participate in any of these experiences, and yet they are entering a program where the social and academic expectations are the same for both groups of students.

The purpose of this study is to analyze the benefits and the advantages of providing public preschool to families. It will also discuss the long-term negative effects on children who did not have the opportunity to attend preschool, and focus on the ways in which this missed opportunity has presented negative effects on home communities.

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Apr 23rd, 6:00 PM Apr 23rd, 6:15 PM

A Position Paper on Preschool Experience vs. No Preschool Experience: Long Term Effects on Academic and Social Readiness of Children

Guzman 307

Despite federal and state investments in early education intervention programs, achievement gaps continue to afflict the education system with children from low-income families having a greater need of a high quality preschool education. When children from poor families move through the education system starting off behind, the chances of academic success becomes increasingly difficult, as the education gap increases year after year and they fall farther behind. By the time these students enter high school, they are so far behind they are unable to catch up and meet the grade level requirements, causing many of them to give up and quit attending school, leading to an increase in the dropout rate.

Research shows if high quality interventions are made during the preschool years, the gap will be minimized and disadvantaged students will be provided with lasting benefits in language, literacy, social and academic skills. These skills that they are provided with early on carry through into adolescence, leading to a more successful educational experience allowing for more students to graduate with a high school diploma, and ultimately decreasing the dropout out rate in the community.

The importance of preschool in building social skills and school readiness by offering public preschool to low-income families, not only benefits the individual child and the families who attend, but it also benefits the local communities and ultimately our society as a whole. Families who cannot afford to pay for preschool have children entering kindergarten with privileged children who are already familiar with class structure, daily routines, socializing with peers, and who have experienced an introduction to academics. Children of low-income families have not had the chance to practice or participate in any of these experiences, and yet they are entering a program where the social and academic expectations are the same for both groups of students.

The purpose of this study is to analyze the benefits and the advantages of providing public preschool to families. It will also discuss the long-term negative effects on children who did not have the opportunity to attend preschool, and focus on the ways in which this missed opportunity has presented negative effects on home communities.