Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 302

Location

Guzman 302

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:00 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 6:15 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne Peters

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Abstract People who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are often at high risk of becoming substance abusers. Recovering addicts with both conditions provide a unique perspective on this phenomenon by sharing their insight. When a diagnosis is determined for a school age child, the Special Education teams mainly focus on the most obvious problems that occur with ADHD: executive function issues, reading and writing impairments, and disruptive behavior. They may not realize how common it is for those identified with ADHD to also become substance abusers, particularly due to school performance problems and difficulties in social adaptation. The literature reveals that there may be a shared genetic basis between ADHD and substance abuse. As described by Carpentier, Arias Vasquez, Hoogman, Onnink, Kan, Kooij, and Buitelaar, (2013), despite many other causative factors, when compared to the control group the subjects with ADHD and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) shared significant genetic factors in common. The literature also shows that there is commonly an early onset of substance abuse for those who have ADHD. Chang, Lichtenstein, and Larsson, (2011), maintain that as early as age 8, children with ADHD possess a high risk for tobacco and alcohol use, and risk of substance abuse increases substantially from early adolescence to mid-adolescence. Finally, the literature discloses that this population has high impairments across several domains of daily life, which complicate treatment response. In a study by Kronenberg, Slager-Visscher, Goossens, van, and van Achterberg, (2013), subjects describe how they feel like they are caught in an endless cycle. They are overwhelmed by thoughts and emotions, become overly impulsive, and end up discarding or destroying whatever structure they possessed. They are no longer able to maintain relationships and incapable of managing finances. When their lives fall apart they feel compelled to use drugs and the vicious cycle begins anew. The purpose of this study is twofold: To generate an increased awareness of the specific connection between substance abuse and ADHD, and to construct a plan of action for special education teachers who need to provide more support for risk prone adolescents. This is a mixed methods study using both qualitative and quantitative information. Participants include adults with ADHD who are recovering drug addicts. They will be asked to complete a questionnaire about their perceptions and the trajectory of their personal experience.

References

Carpentier, P. J., Arias Vasquez, A., Hoogman, M., Onnink, M., Kan, C. C., Kooij, J. J. S., Buitelaar, J. K. (2013). Shared and unique genetic contributions to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and substance use disorders: A pilot study of six candidate genes. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(-), 448-457. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.003

Chang, Z, Lichtenstein, P., & Larsson, H. (2012). The effects of childhood ADHD symptoms on early-onset substance use: A swedish twin study. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(3), 425-435. doi:10.1007/s10802-011-9575-6

Kronenberg, L., Slager-Visscher, K., Goossens, P., van, d. B., & van Achterberg, T. (2014). Everyday life consequences of substance use in adult patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD): A patient's perspective. BMC Psychiatry, 14(1), 1-18. doi:10.1186/s12888-014-0264-1

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Apr 23rd, 6:00 PM Apr 23rd, 6:15 PM

From ADHD to Substance Abuse; Perspectives from Recovering Addicts

Guzman 302

Abstract People who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are often at high risk of becoming substance abusers. Recovering addicts with both conditions provide a unique perspective on this phenomenon by sharing their insight. When a diagnosis is determined for a school age child, the Special Education teams mainly focus on the most obvious problems that occur with ADHD: executive function issues, reading and writing impairments, and disruptive behavior. They may not realize how common it is for those identified with ADHD to also become substance abusers, particularly due to school performance problems and difficulties in social adaptation. The literature reveals that there may be a shared genetic basis between ADHD and substance abuse. As described by Carpentier, Arias Vasquez, Hoogman, Onnink, Kan, Kooij, and Buitelaar, (2013), despite many other causative factors, when compared to the control group the subjects with ADHD and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) shared significant genetic factors in common. The literature also shows that there is commonly an early onset of substance abuse for those who have ADHD. Chang, Lichtenstein, and Larsson, (2011), maintain that as early as age 8, children with ADHD possess a high risk for tobacco and alcohol use, and risk of substance abuse increases substantially from early adolescence to mid-adolescence. Finally, the literature discloses that this population has high impairments across several domains of daily life, which complicate treatment response. In a study by Kronenberg, Slager-Visscher, Goossens, van, and van Achterberg, (2013), subjects describe how they feel like they are caught in an endless cycle. They are overwhelmed by thoughts and emotions, become overly impulsive, and end up discarding or destroying whatever structure they possessed. They are no longer able to maintain relationships and incapable of managing finances. When their lives fall apart they feel compelled to use drugs and the vicious cycle begins anew. The purpose of this study is twofold: To generate an increased awareness of the specific connection between substance abuse and ADHD, and to construct a plan of action for special education teachers who need to provide more support for risk prone adolescents. This is a mixed methods study using both qualitative and quantitative information. Participants include adults with ADHD who are recovering drug addicts. They will be asked to complete a questionnaire about their perceptions and the trajectory of their personal experience.

References

Carpentier, P. J., Arias Vasquez, A., Hoogman, M., Onnink, M., Kan, C. C., Kooij, J. J. S., Buitelaar, J. K. (2013). Shared and unique genetic contributions to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and substance use disorders: A pilot study of six candidate genes. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(-), 448-457. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.003

Chang, Z, Lichtenstein, P., & Larsson, H. (2012). The effects of childhood ADHD symptoms on early-onset substance use: A swedish twin study. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(3), 425-435. doi:10.1007/s10802-011-9575-6

Kronenberg, L., Slager-Visscher, K., Goossens, P., van, d. B., & van Achterberg, T. (2014). Everyday life consequences of substance use in adult patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD): A patient's perspective. BMC Psychiatry, 14(1), 1-18. doi:10.1186/s12888-014-0264-1