Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 202

Presentation or Panel Title

The Effects of Horizontal Violence on California New Grads Nurse’s Performance in the First Year of Employment: A Literature Review

Location

Guzman 202

Start Date

4-23-2015 7:20 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:35 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Luanne-Linnard Palmer

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Nursing is a health profession focused on individuals, families, and communities so that they may attain and maintain their optimal health and quality of life. Nurses provide efficient physical and emotional care in a compassionate, caring and respectful manner, while working as part of an interdisciplinary team to provide safe and effective health care. They are often seen as selfless, empathetic medical professionals, who hold themselves to a high standard and constantly self-sacrifice in order to care for others.

However, interpersonal conflict among nurses, which is commonly known as horizontal violence, is a significant issue in the nursing profession (Lachman, 2014). Becher & Visovsky (2012) defines horizontal violence as the hostile, aggressive, and harmful behavior by a nurse or group of nurses towards a co-worker or group of nurses via attitudes, actions, words and/or behaviors. Acts of horizontal violence can be repeated, offensive, abusive, intimidating, insulting behavior, abuse of power, or unfair sanctions that makes recipients upset and feel humiliated, vulnerable, or threatened, creating stress and undermining their self-confidence. (Vessey & DiFazio, 2010). Bullying and harassment in the workplace can have significant effects on the performance of new grads including fostering medication errors and preventable adverse events, contribute to poor patient outcomes, increase the cost of care, and cause qualified clinicians, administrators, and managers to seek new positions in more professional environments (The Joint Commission, 2008). This act of violence is better known in lay terms as “nurses eating their young”, and this practice has been the norm within the profession (Hippeli, 2009). As a result, horizontal violence is underreported by new grad nurses due to fear of retaliation, blackmail or job displacement.

“Nurses eating their young” is a culture that negatively affects the performance of new grad nurses. The purpose of this literature review and research proposal is to investigate the effects of horizontal violence on California new grads nurse’s performance within the first year of employment via a descriptive design.

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Apr 23rd, 7:20 PM Apr 23rd, 7:35 PM

The Effects of Horizontal Violence on California New Grads Nurse’s Performance in the First Year of Employment: A Literature Review

Guzman 202

Nursing is a health profession focused on individuals, families, and communities so that they may attain and maintain their optimal health and quality of life. Nurses provide efficient physical and emotional care in a compassionate, caring and respectful manner, while working as part of an interdisciplinary team to provide safe and effective health care. They are often seen as selfless, empathetic medical professionals, who hold themselves to a high standard and constantly self-sacrifice in order to care for others.

However, interpersonal conflict among nurses, which is commonly known as horizontal violence, is a significant issue in the nursing profession (Lachman, 2014). Becher & Visovsky (2012) defines horizontal violence as the hostile, aggressive, and harmful behavior by a nurse or group of nurses towards a co-worker or group of nurses via attitudes, actions, words and/or behaviors. Acts of horizontal violence can be repeated, offensive, abusive, intimidating, insulting behavior, abuse of power, or unfair sanctions that makes recipients upset and feel humiliated, vulnerable, or threatened, creating stress and undermining their self-confidence. (Vessey & DiFazio, 2010). Bullying and harassment in the workplace can have significant effects on the performance of new grads including fostering medication errors and preventable adverse events, contribute to poor patient outcomes, increase the cost of care, and cause qualified clinicians, administrators, and managers to seek new positions in more professional environments (The Joint Commission, 2008). This act of violence is better known in lay terms as “nurses eating their young”, and this practice has been the norm within the profession (Hippeli, 2009). As a result, horizontal violence is underreported by new grad nurses due to fear of retaliation, blackmail or job displacement.

“Nurses eating their young” is a culture that negatively affects the performance of new grad nurses. The purpose of this literature review and research proposal is to investigate the effects of horizontal violence on California new grads nurse’s performance within the first year of employment via a descriptive design.