Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 202

Location

Guzman 202

Start Date

4-23-2015 7:00 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 5:15 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Peters, Madalienne

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Parents/guardians and caregivers who have children enrolled within support programs such as speech, OT, specialized support instruction, etc., may not fully comprehend the importance of the role they play in supporting their child’s education. Often they show up to their child's annual IEP (Individualized Education Program) and listen in silence. They may feel it is impossible to comprehend the process and/or the language used in the meeting, leaving parents/guardians and caregivers voiceless and at a loss as how to serve as an advocate for their child. “Almost 30 years of research and experience has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by—strengthening the role and responsibility of parents and ensuring that families of such children have meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children at school and at home” (Conroy, Katsiyannis, & Collins, 2010, p.1).

Parents/guardians/caregivers are as important to a child’s education as are the educators who teach them. Studies show that "…one-third to two-thirds of children with diagnosed conduct problems demonstrate clinically significant improvements following parent training" (Gross, Belcher, Ofonedu, Breitenstein, Frick, & Chakra. 2014, p. 4). If people with decision making responsibility for children with special needs have background knowledge on services they can make informed decisions about support services.

In general, “…special education students with learning disabilities fell from 46 percent in 2000-01 to 38 percent in 2009-10, but these students still remained the single largest disability group.” (Aron, & Loprest, 2012, p. 5). The number of modifications teachers and other professionals need to make a number of modifications for children with special needs.

The purpose of this study is to measure the level of parents/guardians/caregivers awareness of the educational support services available within their district. The findings of this study will be used to inform educators how to better communicate the availability such services.

Aron, L., & Loprest, P. (2012). Disability and the Education System. Future Of Children, 22(1), 97-122.

Conroy, T., Yell, M. L., Katsiyannis, A., & Collins, T. S. (2010). The U.S. Supreme Court and Parental Rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Focus On Exceptional Children, 43(2), 1-16

Gross, D. A., Belcher, H. E., Ofonedu, M. E., Breitenstein, S., Frick, K. D., & Chakra, B. (2014). Study protocol for a comparative effectiveness trial of two parent training programs in a fee-for-service mental health clinic: can we improve mental health services to low-income families?. Trials, 15(1), 1-18. doi:10.1186/1745-6215-15-70

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Apr 23rd, 7:00 PM Apr 23rd, 5:15 PM

Giving a Voice to Parent/Guardians/Caregivers od Students with Special Needs Within the K-12 Education System in a Suburban School District

Guzman 202

Parents/guardians and caregivers who have children enrolled within support programs such as speech, OT, specialized support instruction, etc., may not fully comprehend the importance of the role they play in supporting their child’s education. Often they show up to their child's annual IEP (Individualized Education Program) and listen in silence. They may feel it is impossible to comprehend the process and/or the language used in the meeting, leaving parents/guardians and caregivers voiceless and at a loss as how to serve as an advocate for their child. “Almost 30 years of research and experience has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by—strengthening the role and responsibility of parents and ensuring that families of such children have meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children at school and at home” (Conroy, Katsiyannis, & Collins, 2010, p.1).

Parents/guardians/caregivers are as important to a child’s education as are the educators who teach them. Studies show that "…one-third to two-thirds of children with diagnosed conduct problems demonstrate clinically significant improvements following parent training" (Gross, Belcher, Ofonedu, Breitenstein, Frick, & Chakra. 2014, p. 4). If people with decision making responsibility for children with special needs have background knowledge on services they can make informed decisions about support services.

In general, “…special education students with learning disabilities fell from 46 percent in 2000-01 to 38 percent in 2009-10, but these students still remained the single largest disability group.” (Aron, & Loprest, 2012, p. 5). The number of modifications teachers and other professionals need to make a number of modifications for children with special needs.

The purpose of this study is to measure the level of parents/guardians/caregivers awareness of the educational support services available within their district. The findings of this study will be used to inform educators how to better communicate the availability such services.

Aron, L., & Loprest, P. (2012). Disability and the Education System. Future Of Children, 22(1), 97-122.

Conroy, T., Yell, M. L., Katsiyannis, A., & Collins, T. S. (2010). The U.S. Supreme Court and Parental Rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Focus On Exceptional Children, 43(2), 1-16

Gross, D. A., Belcher, H. E., Ofonedu, M. E., Breitenstein, S., Frick, K. D., & Chakra, B. (2014). Study protocol for a comparative effectiveness trial of two parent training programs in a fee-for-service mental health clinic: can we improve mental health services to low-income families?. Trials, 15(1), 1-18. doi:10.1186/1745-6215-15-70