Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 201

Presentation or Panel Title

English As a Second Language (ESL) Students' Functional Language Production at the Community College Level

Location

Guzman 201

Start Date

4-23-2015 7:00 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 7:15 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne Peters

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The production of functional language in the English as a Second Language (ESL) community college classroom must be studied on several levels. The ESL learner who steps into the secondary classroom arrives with an array of social, cultual and educational background differences. The ESL student at the community college level brings a multi-faceted history to the classroom.

According to the research literature, in the community college context, it is important for the instructor to understand and evaluate the ESL learner’s development and performance based on metacognitive development. “How can helping students analyze the macro and microelements of a text help them improve the overall structure and texture of their writing?” (Guan, 2009, p.1) Content learning is paramount to the ESL student developing solid skills in growing form and function in language production. “Systemic Functional Linguistics” must make sense to the learner when incorporating and initializing language function and personal meaning. (Huang, 2004, p. 236) Along with cogitive research, writing strageties in the ESL classroom are critical in encouraging functional language production and skill development.

The teacher and student participants will engage in “corrective feedback” allowing the students to analyze grammar and mechanical gaps in the students’ writing development (Atkinson, 2014, p.1) The ESL students will complete a questionnaire upon arriving in the classroom. Responses to the questionnaire serve to measure the functional language skills these students bring to the classroom at the beginning of the semester and the changes or improvements that may occur by the end of the semester. A post test will be administered. The ESL community college students’ personal background, relationship to functional language, previous education, writing strategy techniques and supplemental instruction are all key elements in evaluating the improvement in functional language skills within this population.

References:

Atkinson, M. (2014). Reframing literacy in adult ESL programs: Making the case for the inclusion of identity. Literacy & Numeracy Studies, 22(1), 3-20. doi:10.5130/lns.v22i1.4176

Guan, E. H. (2009). Systemic text analysis in the ESL writing classroom: Does it work? RELC Journal, 40(3), 333. Retrieved fromhttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.dominican.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=46798315&site=eds-live

Huang, J., & Newbern, C. (2012). The effects of metacognitive reading strategy instruction on reading performance of adult ESL learners with limited English and literacy skills. Journal of Research & Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary & Basic Education, 1(2), 66-77. Retrieved fromhttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.dominican.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=87524569&site=eds-live

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Apr 23rd, 7:00 PM Apr 23rd, 7:15 PM

English As a Second Language (ESL) Students' Functional Language Production at the Community College Level

Guzman 201

The production of functional language in the English as a Second Language (ESL) community college classroom must be studied on several levels. The ESL learner who steps into the secondary classroom arrives with an array of social, cultual and educational background differences. The ESL student at the community college level brings a multi-faceted history to the classroom.

According to the research literature, in the community college context, it is important for the instructor to understand and evaluate the ESL learner’s development and performance based on metacognitive development. “How can helping students analyze the macro and microelements of a text help them improve the overall structure and texture of their writing?” (Guan, 2009, p.1) Content learning is paramount to the ESL student developing solid skills in growing form and function in language production. “Systemic Functional Linguistics” must make sense to the learner when incorporating and initializing language function and personal meaning. (Huang, 2004, p. 236) Along with cogitive research, writing strageties in the ESL classroom are critical in encouraging functional language production and skill development.

The teacher and student participants will engage in “corrective feedback” allowing the students to analyze grammar and mechanical gaps in the students’ writing development (Atkinson, 2014, p.1) The ESL students will complete a questionnaire upon arriving in the classroom. Responses to the questionnaire serve to measure the functional language skills these students bring to the classroom at the beginning of the semester and the changes or improvements that may occur by the end of the semester. A post test will be administered. The ESL community college students’ personal background, relationship to functional language, previous education, writing strategy techniques and supplemental instruction are all key elements in evaluating the improvement in functional language skills within this population.

References:

Atkinson, M. (2014). Reframing literacy in adult ESL programs: Making the case for the inclusion of identity. Literacy & Numeracy Studies, 22(1), 3-20. doi:10.5130/lns.v22i1.4176

Guan, E. H. (2009). Systemic text analysis in the ESL writing classroom: Does it work? RELC Journal, 40(3), 333. Retrieved fromhttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.dominican.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=46798315&site=eds-live

Huang, J., & Newbern, C. (2012). The effects of metacognitive reading strategy instruction on reading performance of adult ESL learners with limited English and literacy skills. Journal of Research & Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary & Basic Education, 1(2), 66-77. Retrieved fromhttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.dominican.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=87524569&site=eds-live