Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 201

Location

Guzman 201

Start Date

4-23-2015 6:40 PM

End Date

4-23-2015 6:55 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne F. Peters, EDD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Overall performance and well-being among student populations can be attributed to a decrease in stress and anxiety levels. Recent studies show a strong correlation between stress reduction using yoga movement, breathing and meditation. A calmer, focused and attentive classroom promotes an environment where both teacher and student experience less disruption. Limited research also supports a positive effect of yoga practice among students exhibiting symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Inattentiveness, impulsive and adverse behaviors can be successfully treated with yoga. Short interventions can offer students the coping skills needed to promote better self-esteem and confidence in learning and achievement (Gates, 2007).

In addition to the widespread diagnosis of ADHD among youth, external stress such as poverty, violence and unhealthy living conditions place added worry onto students, affecting academic success and personal growth. Incidence of childhood obesity, diabetes and asthma, particularly among minority youth, reveal both poor nutrition and lack of exercise. These conditions reinforce poor concentration and lack of self-control and prevent students from being fully present to their classroom experience. Just as important, the emphasis on accountability and testing by schools and school districts, places added pressure on students and teachers, particularly where resources are scarce. “In Yoga classes, learning takes place in a dynamic, supportive, and encouraging environment where students are not hampered by the pressures of testing or the fear of failure.” (Harper. 2010, p. 101).

Yoga Ed curriculum, published in 2002, was used at The Accelerated School in the Los Angeles School District. The program supports and aligns with earlier research by Benson (as cited in Kuo, 2004.), where a relaxation response curriculum was used to promote academic success.

Student stress and teacher burnout are factors that influenced the direction of my research. My purpose is to take a close look at the relationship between yoga practice and classroom management for both student and teacher.

Gates, G. S. (2007). Emerging thought and research on student, teacher, and administrator stress and coping. Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing.

Harper, J. C. (2010). Teaching yoga in urban elementary schools. International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 20, 99-109.

Kuo, F. E. (2004). A study of the yoga ed program at the accelerated school. Yoga Studies, , 17-17.Retrieved from ttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=awh&AN=23058067&site=eds-live

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Apr 23rd, 6:40 PM Apr 23rd, 6:55 PM

The Effects of Yoga Practice and Classroom Management in an Elementary School Setting

Guzman 201

Overall performance and well-being among student populations can be attributed to a decrease in stress and anxiety levels. Recent studies show a strong correlation between stress reduction using yoga movement, breathing and meditation. A calmer, focused and attentive classroom promotes an environment where both teacher and student experience less disruption. Limited research also supports a positive effect of yoga practice among students exhibiting symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Inattentiveness, impulsive and adverse behaviors can be successfully treated with yoga. Short interventions can offer students the coping skills needed to promote better self-esteem and confidence in learning and achievement (Gates, 2007).

In addition to the widespread diagnosis of ADHD among youth, external stress such as poverty, violence and unhealthy living conditions place added worry onto students, affecting academic success and personal growth. Incidence of childhood obesity, diabetes and asthma, particularly among minority youth, reveal both poor nutrition and lack of exercise. These conditions reinforce poor concentration and lack of self-control and prevent students from being fully present to their classroom experience. Just as important, the emphasis on accountability and testing by schools and school districts, places added pressure on students and teachers, particularly where resources are scarce. “In Yoga classes, learning takes place in a dynamic, supportive, and encouraging environment where students are not hampered by the pressures of testing or the fear of failure.” (Harper. 2010, p. 101).

Yoga Ed curriculum, published in 2002, was used at The Accelerated School in the Los Angeles School District. The program supports and aligns with earlier research by Benson (as cited in Kuo, 2004.), where a relaxation response curriculum was used to promote academic success.

Student stress and teacher burnout are factors that influenced the direction of my research. My purpose is to take a close look at the relationship between yoga practice and classroom management for both student and teacher.

Gates, G. S. (2007). Emerging thought and research on student, teacher, and administrator stress and coping. Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing.

Harper, J. C. (2010). Teaching yoga in urban elementary schools. International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 20, 99-109.

Kuo, F. E. (2004). A study of the yoga ed program at the accelerated school. Yoga Studies, , 17-17.Retrieved from ttp://ezproxy.dominican.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=awh&AN=23058067&site=eds-live