Dominican University of California
 

Oral Presentations - Guzman 201

Presentation or Panel Title

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Current Treatments, And The Lasting Effects On Bone Mineral Density In Children: A Literature Review

Location

Guzman 201

Start Date

4-24-2015 12:40 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:55 PM

Department

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Luanne Linnard-Palmer

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is currently the most commonly presenting form of leukemia in children. It represents almost 25% of cancer diagnoses among children younger than 15 (National Cancer Institute, 2015). Current invasive treatments, the leukemia process itself, as well as diet and physical activity deficiencies in this pediatric population have been associated with significant decreases in bone mineral density (BMD). Low bone mineral density is associated with increased fracture risk and is used in order to define Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a bone disorder which compromises bone strength. Osteoporosis is a disease typically present in the elderly population. However, Osteoporosis has recently been seen as late affect of childhood cancer. Almost all treatments currently used for ALL consist of some combination of high-dose glucocorticoids and intrathecal methotrexate, which affect bone formation by altering osteoblastic activity and proliferation (Baker, 2008). Other etiologic factors that may affect BMD as a result of ALL include the leukemia process itself, a decrease in physical activity, and compromised nutrition (Baytan, 2010). The purpose of this review is to explore the association between ALL and decreased BMD in children to determine preventative measures, if any, for reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in children with ALL.

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Apr 24th, 12:40 PM Apr 24th, 12:55 PM

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Current Treatments, And The Lasting Effects On Bone Mineral Density In Children: A Literature Review

Guzman 201

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is currently the most commonly presenting form of leukemia in children. It represents almost 25% of cancer diagnoses among children younger than 15 (National Cancer Institute, 2015). Current invasive treatments, the leukemia process itself, as well as diet and physical activity deficiencies in this pediatric population have been associated with significant decreases in bone mineral density (BMD). Low bone mineral density is associated with increased fracture risk and is used in order to define Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a bone disorder which compromises bone strength. Osteoporosis is a disease typically present in the elderly population. However, Osteoporosis has recently been seen as late affect of childhood cancer. Almost all treatments currently used for ALL consist of some combination of high-dose glucocorticoids and intrathecal methotrexate, which affect bone formation by altering osteoblastic activity and proliferation (Baker, 2008). Other etiologic factors that may affect BMD as a result of ALL include the leukemia process itself, a decrease in physical activity, and compromised nutrition (Baytan, 2010). The purpose of this review is to explore the association between ALL and decreased BMD in children to determine preventative measures, if any, for reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in children with ALL.